Within lean manufacturing there are 8 types of lean waste that is constantly being reviewed and reduced through continuous improvement.
The definition of lean waste is everything done that does not add value to the product from the costumer’s perspective. The types of lean waste are defined below.

Types of Lean Waste

  • Overproduction: Is if a process continues to produce when it isn’t needed. This cause excess amount of inventory at a cost, or scrap if the product aren’t sold or no longer needed.
  • Waiting: This is when for example machine or personal is in idle as an upstream process does not deliver when required.
  • Transport: Is when material or parts is being transported from one operation to another. This transportation should be minimized as much as possible to reduce processing time and issues due to additional handling of products.
  • Over Processing: Is when something that is not needed is done as part of the process. For example, paint a part in an area not visible to the costumer, or requesting same information twice in a form.
  • Inventory: this is unnecessary inventory not needed, that ads cost in additional storage areas and handling.
  • Motion: This is additional movement by people or machines due to an inefficient process set-up. For example an employee having to get up to access equipment instead of having it within reach at a workstation.
  • Defects: This refers to defective parts coming from a process, this result in cost due to material scrapped as well as processing prior to detecting the defect.
  • Unutilised People: This is not using the full potential of an employee. For example an engineer working in the reception.

Eliminating Lean Waste

Eliminating the 8 wastes can be done through implementation of lean and the use of lean tools within your organisation.

If you are interested in lean or problem solving to reduce amount of defect from a process, then our 8D Problem Solving Training might be interesting for you. It is a detailed training on how to effectively solve problems and prevent them from reoccurring.

Alternatively you can continue to our quality training page for an overview of other training we provide.

Go to Quality Training

Lean Waste