Reliability Analysis is used to understand the lifespan of a product or part. The test will span from the beginning where the unit have normal operation and until failure.

Scope of Reliability Analysis

If looking to do a reliability analysis on a product, the depth of component level details needs to be chosen. For example, if doing the analysis on a mobile phone, is it enough to know when a display is failing, or is information on the components inside the display required.
Looking at the example with the mobile phone, the reliability analysis might consider following elements in a test.

  • Display
  • Antenna A
  • Antenna B
  • Key A
  • Key B
  • PCB
  • Charger Connector
  • Headset Connector

The entire system being tested consists of all of the elements above, and if one of them fails the system (mobile phone) no longer work as intended.

Defining the Reliability Analysis

Using the example from the previous section, we might be interested in analysing how long a product last during normal use, and if it extend the warranty period of 2 years.
In order to define the test, there need to be an understanding of what the user pattern is for the consumers. Some examples are given below.

  • How many times does a user press Key A and Key B over a period of two years.
  • How many times and in which areas does the consumer press the touch screen display.
  • With which force is the keys and display pressed.
  • What is the temperature and humidity profiles over the two year period.
  • How often is the charger and headset connected.
  • What kind of bend and twist will the phone be exposed to.
  • Amount of drops and the height and surface it is dropped on.

If you would like to know more about reliability analysis and how to use it as part of problem solving or risk mitigation, then our 8D Training or FMEA Training might be of interest to you.

Alternatively you can continue to our quality training page to see our available courses.

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Reliability Analysis