In order to do something organised and reputedly, work needs to be standardised. By breaking a work process down into elements that are properly sequenced, organised and followed, you are able to repeatedly perform the work in the most efficient way.

The Principle of Standardised Work

Standardised Work is a detailed visual definition of how an employee should follow an amount of predefined steps in a work process. This can with great benefit be implemented in departments like warehouse, manufacturing and shipping.
The Standardised Work represent best practice for how work is done most efficiently in that particular process. By doing the work in a standardised way, continuous improvement and problem solving is also not possible if the process is in a constant state of change.
The standardised work definition should also be used when new employees are trained, that way consistent training is assured across different supervisors. It also provides a standard to audit against, to avoid employees developing shortcuts or bad habits over time.

Elements of Standardised Work

Below are the three elements of standardised work.

  • Takt Time: Is the rate a production needs to run to match the demand.
  • Cycle Time: Is the average total production time per unit produced.
  • Work Sequence: Is the sequence tasks are followed in a work process.

Tools for Standardised Work

  • Workcell Layout: This cover the layout of the workcell used to produce the product, including locations for work benches, tools, pallets and so forth.
  • Time Study: Balancing the time in a process is important, as it eliminates waste like additional inventory and waiting time. Each worker in a cell must have close to similar amount of work, as productivity otherwise will be reduced.
  • Combination Sheet: This is a visual representation of the process focusing on the sequence of the process steps.

Standardised Work is one of the lean tools, if you found it interesting then our 5S Training might be of interest to you. It is usually the first step to take when starting out with lean, as it creates the foundation for further improvements to be implemented.

Alternatively you can continue to our Quality Training page to see some of the other types of training we provide.

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standardised work